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Jumpstarting Creativity

Finding the Writer Within! A FREE Online Summit for Writers at Every Level.

I’m a featured speaker at this year’s Finding the Writer Within—an online summit hosted by Sage Adderley, a writer’s coach, and author. It’s all starting August 2, and you won’t want to miss a minute.

We’ll be doing Art + Writing Exercises + Mini Workshop sessions on topics from mindset, being in your greatness, listening to your muse, writing diverse characters, and more! Sessions are led by award-winning artists, teachers, speakers, and authors from all over the country (including me).

It’s easy to come along! You don’t need to leave your home. Finding the Writer Within is a summer creative retreat that’ll fit around your schedule, and best of all, it’s absolutely FREE.

If one of your goals is to finally start or finish your book, OR you want to try something new and have some fun, then come join us at Finding the Writer Within!

RESERVE YOUR SPOT IN THE EVENT HERE

I hope to see you there!

Lauren Sapala is the author of The INFJ Writer, The INFJ Revolution, and the creator of Intuitive Writing, a six-step online video course for INFJ and INFP writers who struggle with writing. She is also currently offering a free copy of her book on creative marketing for INFJ and INFP writers to anyone who signs up for her newsletter. SIGN UP HERE to get your free copy of Firefly Magic: Heart Powered Marketing for Highly Sensitive Writers.

Creatively Blocked? You May Be Trying to Use Your Creativity for the Wrong Reasons

Whenever I talk to a new client who’s come to me because they’re suffering the pain of blocked creativity, I start by drilling down into the values that motivate their creative life. In other words, the reason they want to be creative or have more creativity in their lives. Through this exercise with my clients, I’ve found that most of the time this remains a general, vague sort of idea to people who feel called to be writers or artists. We know we want to connect with our creativity on a deeper level, but when we examine why that is, we have a hard time coming up with answers. Continue Reading

Seven Sinful Writing Tips for Transgressive Fiction Authors.

Today’s guest post comes from the satirical G.C. McKay, author of the anthology Sauced up, Scarred and at Sleaze  and his recently released novel, Fubar. G.C. is one of my favorite writer friends because he always pushes limits and questions the status quo. Plus, he manages to be totally irreverent and profound at the same time. The following is his take on the writing “rules” for transgressive fiction authors.

Transgressive fiction gets a pretty raw deal. In fact, it gets the same treatment by the world we live in as its characters often do inside their stories. This is probably to be expected, as the themes it explores are normally on the, shall we say, darker side of the human spectrum. Whilst we can argue till our faces turn blue (sexual-innuendo obviously implied) about what actually defines transgressive fiction, I’d venture to guess that we can all agree that it… unnerves us, as Lauren Sapala so adequately put it in her post Why are so Many Writers Afraid of Transgressive Fiction?

On that note, here are seven sin-ridden writing tips to keep in mind when your gunk-filled fingernails sit poised over the keyboard: Continue Reading

Why Are So Many Writers Afraid of Transgressive Fiction?

I got an email from a writer the other day asking about transgressive fiction. She had seen my previous article, What It’s Like to Be a Female Author Who Writes Transgressive Fiction, and she was curious about a couple of things. Number one, she wanted to know how I fueled my ideas to write in this genre, and two, she wanted to know how I handled the reactions of my friends and family members. In particular, did any of my friends and family think I was just writing about my “twisted fantasies”? Continue Reading

Writers! Are You Doing NaNoWriMo This Year? Read This First.

It’s that time of year where I’m flooded with phone calls from panicked writers who are trying desperately to prepare for NaNoWriMo. For me, the end of October is always filled with these kinds of last-minute coaching sessions, in which I talk writers down from the ledge and convince them that all will be okay and that they CAN make it through NaNo.

From all these years doing all these frantic phone calls with writers, I have noticed a pattern. Writers who have done NaNo before definitely seem to have an easier time of it, because they already know the thing that first-timers have to learn on their own: Continue Reading