Browsing Tag

INFP writer

A Writer’s Retreat Made Especially for Weird Writers

Glitter Man

A couple of months ago I posted Writers, Poets, Misfits and Other “Weird” People: It’s Time to Stand Up and Own It and I got an overwhelming response. So many people emailed me to say that they have always felt out of place all their lives, that they never knew where they fit in, or even if they ever would. They were surprised and relieved to find that others felt the same way. Suddenly, a whole new world had opened up to them. Continue Reading

The 3 Biggest Obstacles for INFP Writers

FSCOver a year ago I wrote an article called, “Introverted and Intuitive? Why the Writing Rules Probably Don’t Work for You.” And I got an overwhelming response from readers. In fact, I’m still getting emails about it. Apparently, there are hundreds of writers out there who run into difficulties when they try to outline their novel, plot the plot, or follow any sort of predetermined method of creation for their characters.

What’s really interesting is that the majority of writers who have reached out to me to say this article struck a deep chord in them have been INFPs. Continue Reading

4 Strange Rituals To Help INFJs Bust Through Writer’s Block

Pink Fish

Today’s Guest Post is from Michaela Chung of Introvert Spring. Thanks so much for contributing Michaela!

As the rarest personality type in the world, INFJs often seem strange to those around them. Rather than fight the stereotype, I thought I’d work with it by sharing some unusual writing advice that only the most gloriously peculiar personalities will appreciate.

Not only are these writing rituals odd, they are also surprisingly effective. Designed with the idiosyncrasies of the INFJ in mind, each tip works with INFJ quirks instead of against them. Read on to discover 4 strange rituals to bust through writer’s block as an INFJ. Continue Reading

Hate Critique? THIS Kind of Critique Might Change Your Mind

For many years I had a shameful writing secret. I hated getting critiqued. I hated it so much, in fact, that I refused to do it. I wrote 600-page manuscripts, edited and revised them dozens of times, and then packed them away in a file on my desktop forever. No one ever read my work, and overall it really kind of sucked.

I was locked in this dysfunctional writing pattern because I had gone through horrible experiences with critique in my creative writing classes in college. But I knew I had to “grow a thick skin” and “get over it” if I ever wanted to be a real writer. I heard that line from so many people and I tried to swallow it. You’ve got to know, I really tried to believe it. Continue Reading