Browsing Tag

infj writers

The Surprising Truth about Successful Writers

Avenues of the Mind

For those of you who regularly read this blog you might know that I’m into the Myers Briggs personality type stuff. However, I also know that some people really don’t like it. They either consider it a scam, or they’re bored by it, or they don’t want to be categorized by the “type” of personality they are supposed to be.

Regardless of how you personally feel about the system, it does offer an essential human truth from which everyone can benefit: Continue Reading

Why INFJs and ENFJs Make Awesome Writing Partners

Dragons Red and GreenIf you’re an INFJ who’s been searching around on the internet for more information on your personality type, you’ve probably noticed that there are a ton of other INFJs out there who profess to feeling lonely, out of place, and on a different wavelength than most of the population. It’s really cool that there are so many online spaces in existence now where INFJs can meet others just like themselves and talk about it. Continue Reading

5 Mistakes for INFJ and INFP Writers To Avoid


Expecting Perfection
INFJs and INFPs are idealists, dreamers, and visionaries. This is really cool when it comes to seeing the potential in a person or project, but it can become a huge obstacle when we refuse to settle for anything less than perfect in our finished manuscript. Continue Reading

Why INFJs Have Trouble Writing

SAMSUNG

According to various sources on the internet, INFJs love to practice creative writing more than anything else. Now, I know that information found online can go either way on the spectrum of accuracy, but I’m inclined to agree with this statement. I’m an INFJ myself, and I actually have a couple other INFJ writer friends, so I bring some personal experience to this. But that’s not the only reason I feel this way. I also own a blog. And as the author of that blog I can see the search terms people use when they stumble across my posts. Every single day I get some form of “INFJ” paired with “trouble writing” or “difficulty writing” or “have a hard time writing.” Continue Reading