Browsing Tag

fiction writing tips

Essential Skills for Writers: Having the Courage to Make Up Your Own Rules

Star Shaped SunglassesRecently I was reading through one of the many writing blogs I subscribe to and I came across a list of do’s and don’ts for writers. Some of the advice came from editors, some from agents, and some from famous, bestselling authors. One of the “rules” said (and I’m paraphrasing): “Any time two characters are sitting around talking about another character the scene is dead.”

I instantly panicked. Continue Reading

5 Easy Ways to Make Writing a Habit

Build a Writing Kit
Sometimes I carry a small canvas bag, and sometimes I use a portfolio binder. You can choose whatever container works for you, as long as you have your laptop, notebook(s), and pens or pencils all in one place and ready to go. Continue Reading

How NaNoWriMo Can Change Your Writing Life

National Novel Writing Month has something for writers of every personality type. Tight deadlines for those who work well under pressure, well-deserved admiration for those who thrive by having their talents recognized, and the freedom to work with or without an outline, according to individual creative taste. Continue Reading

Cooking up Chemistry between Characters

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Good characters can make or break your novel.

An audience will follow an extraordinary, kick-ass character through any number of complex scenes, plot twists, and controversial decisions. As a writer, you already know that the best characters are layered, multi-dimensional beings who can think for themselves. You know that you have to go inside each character to get something awesome happening on the outside. Continue Reading

Compassion and Character Study

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Every writer knows that bad writing usually includes one-dimensional characters. Readers aren’t satisfied by a story in which the heroes are sugary sweet and the villains seem motivated only by pure evil. Not only is it difficult to get emotionally attached to characters with superficial personalities, but their actions don’t add much to the story. We already know what they’re going to do before they do it, and why. Because they’re good. Or because they’re evil. Case closed. Continue Reading