Writers Be Warned: Never Break This One Writing Rule

Of all the “writing rules,” this is the one almost every writer breaks.

It’s also the one that will always bite you in the ass if you break it.

If you break this rule, your story will punish you for it. Your plot will fall flat and your ending will fizzle. In fact, you might not even reach the end because your book will have given up on you long before you’re lucky enough to reach that point.

Here’s the rule: Continue Reading

Author Interview: Peter Gajdics on ‘The Inheritance of Shame’

Today’s interview is with Peter Gajdics, author of The Inheritance of Shame, one of the books that made my ‘Top 5 Memoirs of 2017’ list. Peter’s book is more than timely given what’s going on in the world today, and his answers to my questions awed and inspired me.


I was completely enthralled by your memoir—not only the subject matter, but the way it was so beautifully written. Can you tell me a little about the process of writing the book? Did you share it in workshops as it was being written, or did you keep it private until it was almost finished?

Writing this book began with my five-page letter of complaint about my former psychiatrist, which I filed through the College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia, Canada, where my six years of “therapy” had occurred. At the close of that complaint process, and after I sued the doctor for medical malpractice, I used those five pages as the foundation for my book. “What happened” in the therapy (dates of treatment, medications he prescribed and their side effects, other acts of impropriety, etc.) were all fairly straight forward, but bringing meaning to my experiences, understanding how it all had impacted me, took years of writing and re-writing, then more writing and rewriting and soul searching. Continue Reading

The Dirty Little Secret about Writing: Self Doubt Never Really Goes Away

I’ve been writing seriously for over ten years now. And by “seriously” I mean writing novels and short stories with an eye toward publication. I’ve published one nonfiction book, and one work of autobiographical fiction. I also coach writers, so I’ve edited countless manuscripts.

Last month I finished the first draft of my next nonfiction book. I’ve spent the last year reading and researching, and the past six months painstakingly writing out each chapter. “I’ve got this,” I thought to myself all summer long. “I finally know what I’m doing.”

Then, a week ago, I read through the entire first draft.

And immediately went into the black pit of despair. Continue Reading