Free YA Thriller from Author Amanda Linehan – Only in October!

My friend Amanda Linehan’s YA thriller, Uncover, is free for the month of October on all retailers. I just finished another one of her books, Lakeside, a couple of months ago and it was fantastic. If you like YA at all, I recommend you pick this one up while it’s free. You won’t be disappointed.

Here’s the summary if you’d like more info:

Marissa wants to put this all behind her. Her best friend has been killed in a car accident, and her death has left more questions than answers. When a friend mentions a lost object that could bring some closure, Marissa reluctantly agrees to help search for it, but finds herself trapped in the dark, making all the wrong moves. Can she find her way out of the darkness?

And here’s the link to get it for free:

Uncover

Happy reading. 🙂

The INFJ Writer 99 Cents! Two Days ONLY!

In celebration of October (my birthday month) and autumn (my favorite season), I’m offering The INFJ Writer for 99 cents for the next two days. It’ll be at this low price for two days ONLY so make sure to grab your copy while you still can.

Happy writing everyone, and happy October!

 

What “Pantsing” Really Means, and Why Most Writers Have it All Wrong

If you’re a writer with even minimal involvement in the online writing community, chances are that you’re familiar with the terms, “plotter,” and “pantser.” And if you’re a plotter who manages to successfully finish books—and by “successfully” I mean get out a sloppy first draft with a rough approximation of a beginning, a middle, and an end—then you probably don’t have much angst about being a plotter. You get an idea for a story, you work on an outline and sort out your story arc, you might even plot scene breakdowns, and then you write according to the plan, adjusting as needed. Sure, the process is still a whole huge ton of hard work, that’s what it takes to write a book, but overall you feel good about your process and it seems to work for you, especially after you’ve written your first novel and you somewhat have the hang of it.

So, what does pantsing look like? Well, most writers assume that it means exactly what the name implies. You fly “by the seat of your pants” and make up the story as you go along. And while there is some truth in that, it also doesn’t accurately cover how exactly the process unfolds as a creative cycle, or why pantsing is a better approach for some writers. As a rule, pantsing as a creative process is wildly misunderstood by most writers and so, if you are a pantser by nature, deepening your comprehension and skill set around the process of pantsing can be a long, bumpy, and very lonely, road. Continue Reading

How Writers Can Stop Being Consumed by the Fear of Not Being Good Enough

Although I have always considered myself a writer, I have also spent many years not writing. In fact, for most of high school, college, and my 20s, I didn’t write at all. Not one story, not one poem. During that period, I was mostly entangled in living the life of a depressed alcoholic, while trying to keep my shit somewhat together in the meantime. So, you could say I didn’t have time to write, but the truth was that I was really in no place to write.

I didn’t start writing seriously—and by seriously I mean that I committed to sitting down and doing it at least once a week—until 2006, one year after I got sober. Two things happened when I committed to the practice of writing. Number one, I found that it was hard. It challenged me on nearly every level and forced me to look honestly at my addictions, my demons, my self-loathing, and my depression. Number two, it felt better than anything I had ever done before. It felt like a huge relief to open doors within myself that had been closed for years and let all those long-buried thoughts and feelings pour out of me onto the page. Continue Reading