The Two Types Most Likely to Feel Like Utter Failures as Writers: INFJs and INFPs

For many years I considered myself an utter failure as a writer. I had a creative writing teacher in college who basically told me that I sucked at writing and I should find something else to do with my life. And the worst part was, I really kind of believed her. Because I had done horribly in every creative writing class I ever took. I came up with ideas for stories, but when I tried to write them down I lost all inspiration. I studied writing craft books, but every time I tried to use the tools they talked about, my story completely fizzled.

I was convinced there was something wrong with me.

It seemed like I just wasn’t cut out to be a writer. Continue Reading

Who Are You to Write This?

Today’s guest post comes from Ritu Kaushal, a San Francisco Bay Area-based author and the blogger behind the popular HSP and empath-centric website Walking Through Transitions. Her writing has appeared on Tiny Buddha, Sensitive Evolution, Elephant Journal and Having Time amongst others. She recently released The Empath’s Journey, a book I highly recommend that every INFJ, INFP, and empath add to their arsenal of tools on how to survive as a Highly Sensitive Person in today’s world.

Sometime last year, as I was trying to give the final push to birth my book The Empath’s Journey, someone asked me: Who are you to write this? These were their exact words. They didn’t say them with curiosity or a desire to know, but with a slashing, hurling, aggressive energy. Continue Reading

Free YA Thriller from Author Amanda Linehan – Only in October!

My friend Amanda Linehan’s YA thriller, Uncover, is free for the month of October on all retailers. I just finished another one of her books, Lakeside, a couple of months ago and it was fantastic. If you like YA at all, I recommend you pick this one up while it’s free. You won’t be disappointed.

Here’s the summary if you’d like more info:

Marissa wants to put this all behind her. Her best friend has been killed in a car accident, and her death has left more questions than answers. When a friend mentions a lost object that could bring some closure, Marissa reluctantly agrees to help search for it, but finds herself trapped in the dark, making all the wrong moves. Can she find her way out of the darkness?

And here’s the link to get it for free:

Uncover

Happy reading. 🙂

What “Pantsing” Really Means, and Why Most Writers Have it All Wrong

If you’re a writer with even minimal involvement in the online writing community, chances are that you’re familiar with the terms, “plotter,” and “pantser.” And if you’re a plotter who manages to successfully finish books—and by “successfully” I mean get out a sloppy first draft with a rough approximation of a beginning, a middle, and an end—then you probably don’t have much angst about being a plotter. You get an idea for a story, you work on an outline and sort out your story arc, you might even plot scene breakdowns, and then you write according to the plan, adjusting as needed. Sure, the process is still a whole huge ton of hard work, that’s what it takes to write a book, but overall you feel good about your process and it seems to work for you, especially after you’ve written your first novel and you somewhat have the hang of it.

So, what does pantsing look like? Well, most writers assume that it means exactly what the name implies. You fly “by the seat of your pants” and make up the story as you go along. And while there is some truth in that, it also doesn’t accurately cover how exactly the process unfolds as a creative cycle, or why pantsing is a better approach for some writers. As a rule, pantsing as a creative process is wildly misunderstood by most writers and so, if you are a pantser by nature, deepening your comprehension and skill set around the process of pantsing can be a long, bumpy, and very lonely, road. Continue Reading